PCAPP Media Library

The Pueblo Chemical Agent-Destruction Pilot Plant has safely destroyed the remaining U.S. chemical weapons stockpile stored at the U.S. Army Pueblo Chemical Depot in Colorado. The depot originally stored 2,613 U.S. tons of the blister agent mustard in projectiles and mortar rounds. PCAPP used neutralization followed by biotreatment and Static Detonation Chamber units to destroy the munitions. Agent destruction operations began March 18, 2015. The last munition in the chemical weapons stockpile in Colorado was destroyed on June 22, 2023. The Pueblo plant is now in the closure phase.

For the Media:

Pueblo Chemical Agent-Destruction Pilot Plant (PCAPP) Completes Safe Destruction of More Than 775,000 Mustard Agent Projectiles

The Pueblo Chemical Agent-Destruction Pilot Plant, known as PCAPP, destroyed the chemical weapons stored at Colorado’s U.S. Army Pueblo Chemical Depot  (PCD). The following video clips show how projectiles and mortar rounds containing mustard agent were processed inside the main plant and the Static Detonation Chamber, or SDC, complex.

  • (0:00-0:42)
    An ordnance technician uses a lift assist device to place a 4.2-inch mortar round onto a conveyor inside the Enhanced Reconfiguration Building (ERB) at PCAPP.
  • (0:43-1:11)
    Inside the Agent Processing Building, a robot in the Munitions Washout System (MWS) places a drained and rinsed 105mm projectile on a weigh station to ensure removal of agent.  Next, an infeed conveyor will take it through the Munitions Treatment Unit (MTU) to complete the decontamination of the munition body. The MTU elevates the temperature of the munition to at least 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit for at least 15 minutes.
  • (1:12-1:26)
    An ordnance technician uses a lift assist device to place a 105mm projectile onto a conveyor inside the ERB at PCAPP. The conveyor carries the projectile into the plant’s automated destruction system.
  • (1:26-1:47)
    An ordnance technician uses a lift assist device to place a 155mm projectile onto a conveyor inside the ERB at PCAPP.
  • (1:48-2:02)
    Inside the Agent Processing Building, a robot in the MWS lifts a 155mm projectile from a feed conveyor, then places the projectile nose down in a Cavity Access Machine to remove agent from the cavity of the projectile. The energetics which propels and explode the round have already been removed in the ERB.
  • (2:03-2:18)
    Ordnance technicians place 105mm projectiles on a conveyor belt during a process called baseline reconfiguration, to prepare these munitions for processing through the plant’s automated system. An ordnance technician will remove the projectiles from the conveyor belt using a lift assist device in the Explosive Containment Room of the ERB and then place the munitions in a holding pallet with other munitions for transport back to PCD to await processing.
  • (2:19-3:17)
    A feed box containing 4.2-inch mortar rounds is conveyed to the top of the vessel and fed to a loading chamber in the SDC complex. High temperatures detonate or deflagrate the munitions, and the mustard agent and explosive components are destroyed by explosion/thermal decomposition.
  • (3:17-3:33)
    A destruction chamber in one of the three SDC units rotates and prepares to empty the chamber of destroyed 4.2-inch mortar rounds. The metal has been thermally decontaminated and will be recycled as scrap.
  • (3:34-3:54)
    In the Toxic Area, Ordnance Technicians install a Lockout, Tagout system on one of the agent pumps to an Agent Neutralization Reactor while replacing a discharge flex hose. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment requires PCAPP to routinely change the hoses to avoid hose failure.

Download captions PDF

Pueblo Chemical Agent-Destruction Pilot Plant (PCAPP) Completes Safe Destruction of More Than 380,000 105mm Mustard Agent Projectiles

The following video clips show how projectiles containing mustard agent were processed inside the main plant.

  • (00:00- 00:10)
    Toxic materials handlers prepare 105mm projectiles for transportation to PCAPP, where they will be destroyed.
  • (00:11-00:23)
    Ordnance technician clips and removes metal banding from palletized 105mm projectiles so the munitions can be destroyed by PCAPP’s automated system.
  • (00:24-00:45)
    An ordnance technician uses a lift assist to place a 105mm projectile onto a conveyor inside the Enhanced Reconfiguration Building at PCAPP (wide shot).
  • (00:46-01:03)
    An ordnance technician uses a lift assist to place a 105mm projectile onto a conveyor inside the Enhanced Reconfiguration Building at PCAPP (close-up).
    (01:04- 01:07)
    A 105mm projectile moves down a conveyor into the Projectile/Mortar Disassembly System.
  • (1:08-1:33)
    Inside the Agent Processing Building, a robot in the Munitions Washout System (MWS) lifts a 105mm projectile from a Cavity Access Machine after the munition has been drained and rinsed to remove mustard agent for neutralization. The robot places the munition onto the drained munition weigh station to ensure removal of agent. Next, an infeed conveyor will take it through the Munitions Treatment Unit (MTU) to complete the decontamination of munitions bodies. The MTU elevates the temperature of the munition to at least 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit for at least 15 minutes.

Pueblo Chemical Agent-Destruction Pilot Plant (PCAPP) 50% Mustard Agent Destroyed

The following video clips show how projectiles containing mustard agent were processed inside the main plant.

  • (0:00-0:20)
    An ordnance technician uses a lift assist to place a 155mm projectile onto a conveyor inside the Enhanced Reconfiguration Building at PCAPP.
  • (0:21-0:40)
    Inside the Agent Processing Building, a robot in the Munitions Washout System (MWS) lifts a 155mm projectile from a Cavity Access Machine after the munition has been drained and rinsed to remove mustard agent for neutralization. The robot places the munition onto the drained munition weigh station to ensure removal of agent. Next, an infeed conveyor will take it through the Munitions Treatment Unit (MTU) to complete the decontamination of munitions bodies. The MTU elevates the temperature of the munition to at least 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit for at least 15 minutes.
  • (0:41-0:58)
    Inside the Agent Processing Building, a robot in the Munitions Washout System (MWS) lifts a 155mm projectile from a feed conveyor. The energetics which propel and explode the round have already been removed in the Enhanced Reconfigure Building. The robot places the munition nose down in a Cavity Access Machine to remove agent from the cavity of the projectile.
  • (0:59-1:32)
    (HD Video) An ordnance technician removes a 105mm projectile off a conveyor belt using a lift assist in the Reconfiguration Room of the Enhanced Reconfiguration Building at PCAPP and places the munition in a holding pallet with other munitions for transport back to PCD to await processing at a later date.
  • (1:33-1:49)
    (HD Video) Munitions are placed on a conveyor in the Enhanced Reconfiguration Building as they make their way from unboxing in the Receiving and Traveling Area to a Vapor Containment Room.
  • (1:50-2:29)
    Closed Circuit video shows an ordnance technician uses a lift assist to place a 155mm projectile onto a conveyor inside the Enhanced Reconfiguration Building at PCAPP.
  • (2:30-2:45)
    Inside an Explosion Containment Room, the Projectile/Mortar Disassembly system removes the nose closure, or lifting lug, from a 155 mm projectile.
  • (2:46-2:56)
    Inside an Explosion Containment Room, the Projectile/Mortar Disassembly system removes the nose closure, while a robotic arm lifts a munition from the burster rod removal station.
  • (2:57-3:07)
    Inside an Explosion Containment Room, the robotic arm lifts the 155mm from the station and places it onto a conveyor.
  • (3:07-3:23)
    Ordnance technicians wearing Demilitarization Protective Ensemble gear prepare secondary waste for disposal.

Pueblo Chemical Agent-Destruction Pilot Plant (PCAPP) Operations

The following video clips show the first 155mm projectiles containing mustard agent being transported from storage igloos at the depot and being processed in the main plant.

  • (0:00-0:18)
    Chemical Material Handlers place the first set of 155mm projectiles onto a pallet for transport from the Pueblo Chemical Depot’s storage igloos to PCAPP.
  • (0:19-0:44)
    Technicians place an overpacked pallet of agent-filled munitions into the bed of a Modified Ammunition Vehicle for transport from the Pueblo Chemical Depot’s storage igloos to PCAPP.
  • (0:45-1:36)
    An ordnance technician uses a lift assist to place the first 155mm projectile onto a conveyor inside the Enhanced Reconfiguration Building at PCAPP.
  • (1:37-1:52)
    Inside an Explosive Containment Room, the Projectile/Mortar Disassembly system removes the nose closure, or fuze, from a munition.
  • (1:53-2:10)
    Inside an Explosive Containment Room, the Projectile/Mortar Disassembly system removes the nose closure, or fuze, from a munition, while a robotic arm lifts a munition from the burster rod removal station.
  • (2:11-2:28)
    Inside an Explosive Containment Room, the Projectile/Mortar Disassembly lifts a 155mm projectile and places it onto a conveyor.

PCAPP Aerial Photo:

PCAPP aerial photo

Pueblo Chemical Agent-Destruction Pilot Plant (PCAPP) Completes Safe Destruction of More Than 775,000 Mustard Agent Projectiles

The Pueblo Chemical Agent-Destruction Pilot Plant, known as PCAPP, destroyed the chemical weapons stored at Colorado’s U.S. Army Pueblo Chemical Depot  (PCD). The following video clips show how projectiles and mortar rounds containing mustard agent were processed inside the main plant and the Static Detonation Chamber, or SDC, complex.

  • (0:00-0:42)
    An ordnance technician uses a lift assist device to place a 4.2-inch mortar round onto a conveyor inside the Enhanced Reconfiguration Building (ERB) at PCAPP.
  • (0:43-1:11)
    Inside the Agent Processing Building, a robot in the Munitions Washout System (MWS) places a drained and rinsed 105mm projectile on a weigh station to ensure removal of agent.  Next, an infeed conveyor will take it through the Munitions Treatment Unit (MTU) to complete the decontamination of the munition body. The MTU elevates the temperature of the munition to at least 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit for at least 15 minutes.
  • (1:12-1:26)
    An ordnance technician uses a lift assist device to place a 105mm projectile onto a conveyor inside the ERB at PCAPP. The conveyor carries the projectile into the plant’s automated destruction system.
  • (1:26-1:47)
    An ordnance technician uses a lift assist device to place a 155mm projectile onto a conveyor inside the ERB at PCAPP.
  • (1:48-2:02)
    Inside the Agent Processing Building, a robot in the MWS lifts a 155mm projectile from a feed conveyor, then places the projectile nose down in a Cavity Access Machine to remove agent from the cavity of the projectile. The energetics which propels and explode the round have already been removed in the ERB.
  • (2:03-2:18)
    Ordnance technicians place 105mm projectiles on a conveyor belt during a process called baseline reconfiguration, to prepare these munitions for processing through the plant’s automated system. An ordnance technician will remove the projectiles from the conveyor belt using a lift assist device in the Explosive Containment Room of the ERB and then place the munitions in a holding pallet with other munitions for transport back to PCD to await processing.
  • (2:19-3:17)
    A feed box containing 4.2-inch mortar rounds is conveyed to the top of the vessel and fed to a loading chamber in the SDC complex. High temperatures detonate or deflagrate the munitions, and the mustard agent and explosive components are destroyed by explosion/thermal decomposition.
  • (3:17-3:33)
    A destruction chamber in one of the three SDC units rotates and prepares to empty the chamber of destroyed 4.2-inch mortar rounds. The metal has been thermally decontaminated and will be recycled as scrap.
  • (3:34-3:54)
    In the Toxic Area, Ordnance Technicians install a Lockout, Tagout system on one of the agent pumps to an Agent Neutralization Reactor while replacing a discharge flex hose. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment requires PCAPP to routinely change the hoses to avoid hose failure.

Download captions PDF

Pueblo Chemical Agent-Destruction Pilot Plant (PCAPP) Completes Safe Destruction of More Than 380,000 105mm Mustard Agent Projectiles

The following video clips show how projectiles containing mustard agent were processed inside the main plant.

  • (00:00- 00:10)
    Toxic materials handlers prepare 105mm projectiles for transportation to PCAPP, where they will be destroyed.
  • (00:11-00:23)
    Ordnance technician clips and removes metal banding from palletized 105mm projectiles so the munitions can be destroyed by PCAPP’s automated system.
  • (00:24-00:45)
    An ordnance technician uses a lift assist to place a 105mm projectile onto a conveyor inside the Enhanced Reconfiguration Building at PCAPP (wide shot).
  • (00:46-01:03)
    An ordnance technician uses a lift assist to place a 105mm projectile onto a conveyor inside the Enhanced Reconfiguration Building at PCAPP (close-up).
    (01:04- 01:07)
    A 105mm projectile moves down a conveyor into the Projectile/Mortar Disassembly System.
  • (1:08-1:33)
    Inside the Agent Processing Building, a robot in the Munitions Washout System (MWS) lifts a 105mm projectile from a Cavity Access Machine after the munition has been drained and rinsed to remove mustard agent for neutralization. The robot places the munition onto the drained munition weigh station to ensure removal of agent. Next, an infeed conveyor will take it through the Munitions Treatment Unit (MTU) to complete the decontamination of munitions bodies. The MTU elevates the temperature of the munition to at least 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit for at least 15 minutes.

Pueblo Chemical Agent-Destruction Pilot Plant (PCAPP) 50% Mustard Agent Destroyed

The following video clips show how projectiles containing mustard agent are processed inside the main plant.

  • (0:00-0:20)
    An ordnance technician uses a lift assist to place a 155mm projectile onto a conveyor inside the Enhanced Reconfiguration Building at PCAPP.
  • (0:21-0:40)
    Inside the Agent Processing Building, a robot in the Munitions Washout System (MWS) lifts a 155mm projectile from a Cavity Access Machine after the munition has been drained and rinsed to remove mustard agent for neutralization. The robot places the munition onto the drained munition weigh station to ensure removal of agent. Next, an infeed conveyor will take it through the Munitions Treatment Unit (MTU) to complete the decontamination of munitions bodies. The MTU elevates the temperature of the munition to at least 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit for at least 15 minutes.
  • (0:41-0:58)
    Inside the Agent Processing Building, a robot in the Munitions Washout System (MWS) lifts a 155mm projectile from a feed conveyor. The energetics which propel and explode the round have already been removed in the Enhanced Reconfigure Building. The robot places the munition nose down in a Cavity Access Machine to remove agent from the cavity of the projectile.
  • (0:59-1:32)
    (HD Video) An ordnance technician removes a 105mm projectile off a conveyor belt using a lift assist in the Reconfiguration Room of the Enhanced Reconfiguration Building at PCAPP and places the munition in a holding pallet with other munitions for transport back to PCD to await processing at a later date.
  • (1:33-1:49)
    (HD Video) Munitions are placed on a conveyor in the Enhanced Reconfiguration Building as they make their way from unboxing in the Receiving and Traveling Area to a Vapor Containment Room.
  • (1:50-2:29)
    Closed Circuit video shows an ordnance technician uses a lift assist to place a 155mm projectile onto a conveyor inside the Enhanced Reconfiguration Building at PCAPP.
  • (2:30-2:45)
    Inside an Explosion Containment Room, the Projectile/Mortar Disassembly system removes the nose closure, or lifting lug, from a 155 mm projectile.
  • (2:46-2:56)
    Inside an Explosion Containment Room, the Projectile/Mortar Disassembly system removes the nose closure, while a robotic arm lifts a munition from the burster rod removal station.
  • (2:57-3:07)
    Inside an Explosion Containment Room, the robotic arm lifts the 155mm from the station and places it onto a conveyor.
  • (3:07-3:23)
    Ordnance technicians wearing Demilitarization Protective Ensemble gear prepare secondary waste for disposal.

Pueblo Chemical Agent-Destruction Pilot Plant (PCAPP) Operations

The following video clips show the first 155mm projectiles containing mustard agent being transported from storage igloos at the depot and being processed in the main plant.

  • (0:00-0:18)
    Chemical Material Handlers place the first set of 155mm projectiles onto a pallet for transport from the Pueblo Chemical Depot’s storage igloos to PCAPP.
  • (0:19-0:44)
    Technicians place an overpacked pallet of agent-filled munitions into the bed of a Modified Ammunition Vehicle for transport from the Pueblo Chemical Depot’s storage igloos to PCAPP.
  • (0:45-1:36)
    An ordnance technician uses a lift assist to place the first 155mm projectile onto a conveyor inside the Enhanced Reconfiguration Building at PCAPP.
  • (1:37-1:52)
    Inside an Explosive Containment Room, the Projectile/Mortar Disassembly system removes the nose closure, or fuze, from a munition.
  • (1:53-2:10)
    Inside an Explosive Containment Room, the Projectile/Mortar Disassembly system removes the nose closure, or fuze, from a munition, while a robotic arm lifts a munition from the burster rod removal station.
  • (2:11-2:28)
    Inside an Explosive Containment Room, the Projectile/Mortar Disassembly lifts a 155mm projectile and places it onto a conveyor.

PCAPP Aerial Photo:

PCAPP aerial photo

PCAPP Fact Sheets:

More PCAPP Resources

To learn more about the PCAPP mission of destroying the U.S. chemical weapons stockpile in Pueblo, click on the links below to access press releases, news articles and videos.

Contact us:

For media inquiries about the Pueblo Chemical Agent-Destruction Pilot Plant, contact:

Sandy Romero
Phone: O: (719) 549-5280 or C: (719) 248-9633
Email: svromero@bechtel.us

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