BGCAPP Media Library

The Blue Grass Chemical Agent-Destruction Pilot Plant has safely destroyed the remaining U.S. chemical weapons stockpile stored at the Blue Grass Army Depot in Kentucky. The depot originally stored 523 U.S. tons of mustard and nerve agent contained in projectiles and rockets. BGCAPP used neutralization and Static Detonation Chamber units to destroy the munitions. Agent destruction operations began June 7, 2019. The last munition in the stockpile in Kentucky was destroyed July 7, 2023.

For the Media:

Video Footage: Blue Grass Chemical Agent-Destruction Pilot Plant Operations

The following video clips show the destruction facilities where mustard and nerve agent munitions were destroyed. Portions of this footage have been blurred in accordance with Department of Defense guidelines.

BGCAPP Main Plant Destroyed GB M55 Rockets from July 2022 to July 2023

This video shows how the main plant destroyed nerve agent munitions from the chemical weapons stockpile stored in Kentucky. Destruction of the M55 rockets containing GB nerve agent began July 6, 2022, and ended July 7, 2023.

  • Workers Place GB M55 Rockets on Transfer Cart (0:00 – 0:14)
    Workers transfer M55 rockets from pallets used for storage and transport to a Rocket Non-Destructive Examination (RNDE) transfer cart.
  • Main Plant Aerial (0:14 – 0:19)
    An aerial drone flies over the Blue Grass main plant.
  • Enhanced On-site Container (EONC) Delivery and Storage (0:19 – 0:24)
    A sideloader truck places an EONC containing M55 rockets next to another EONC inside the Container Handling Building. A portion of this footage is sped up.
    The EONCs are containers designed to safely transport the chemical munitions from their monitored storage on the Blue Grass Army Depot to the Blue Grass Chemical Agent-Destruction Pilot Plant for destruction.
  • Workers Monitor the EONC for Agent Readings (0:24 – 0:27)
    Workers use the Miniature Continuous Air Monitoring System to check for readings of chemical agent inside the EONC before opening the door.
  • Workers Open and Unload M55 Rockets from the EONC (0:27 – 0:38)
    Workers open, inspect and unload two pallets of M55 rockets from an EONC.
  • Worker Removes Band from Pallet (0:38 – 0:45)
    A worker uses a tool to cut the metal bands off the pallet of M55 rockets in preparation for unpacking the rockets.
    Pan of M55 rockets on the pallet waiting to be unloaded.
  • Unpacking and Loading Rockets onto Transfer Cart (0:45 – 1:02)
    Workers unpack the M55 rockets from a pallet and load them onto a transfer cart.
  • RNDE Equipment (0:50 – 1:36)
    A worker loads a transfer cart of M55 rockets into the RNDE equipment.
    A worker pushes the button to start the RNDE equipment.
    An M55 rocket is tilted to enter the machine for evaluation.
    Workers examine an image, much like an X-ray, of the M55 rocket to look for agent leakage.
    An M55 rocket is picked up and moved to a transfer cart after being scanned in the RNDE equipment.
  • Workers Place M55 Rockets on Conveyor (1:36 – 2:15)
    A worker pushes a transfer cart to the loading position for the rocket input assembly.
    Workers place M55 rockets onto the rocket input assembly. The rockets are then fed one at a time onto the conveyor to begin the automated destruction process.
  • Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) Footage of an M55 Rocket in Explosive Containment Vestibule (2:15 – 4:53)
    The rocket enters the Explosive Containment Vestibule and a robot places it in the Vertical Rocket Cutting Machine.
    The machine cuts the shipping and firing tube and the robot removes the top portion.
    The first robot stabilizes the rocket as the machine then makes a second cut to separate the warhead from the motor while a second robot places the shipping and firing tube on a conveyor to go to the Motor Packing Room.
    Once separated, the first robot picks up the warhead to place it on the transfer station.
    The first robot turns to retrieve the rocket motor from the Vertical Rocket Cutting Machine while the second robot picks up the warhead to continue its path to destruction.
    The conveyor moves the warhead to the Explosive Containment Room.
  • CCTV Footage of an M55 Rocket Warhead in the Explosive Containment Room (4:54 – 7:38)
    Automated equipment punches the warhead and the chemical agent is drained, collected and neutralized.
    A robot places the warhead in a crimper station where it is containerized.
  • CCTV Footage of the Warhead Container Labeling Station (7:38 – 8:46)
    The robots move the containerized warhead to the next room where it is labeled and placed on a Mobile Industrial Robot.
    The robot moves the container to be placed in a skid.
  • CCTV Footage of the Motor Packing Room (8:46 – 9:39)
    A robot places the shipping and firing tube in a box for storage and later shipment for disposal.
    The robot then places the rocket motor into a box for storage and later destruction.
  • Boxes of Rocket Motors Sent for Storage (9:40 – 9:55)
    The boxes are loaded onto a truck and are sent to a storage igloo for storage before they are later shipped for final disposal.
  • Pallets of Rocket Warheads Sent for Storage (9:55 – 10:11)
    Workers load the containerized, drained rocket warhead skids onto a truck.
    A truck transports containerized, drained rocket warhead skids to a storage igloo for later destruction in a Static Detonation Chamber.
  • Hydrolysate Storage Area tanks (10:11 – 10:22)
    The Hydrolysate Storage Area tanks store hydrolysate, the product of the neutralization of chemical agent, until it is ready to be shipped to a permitted hazardous waste treatment, storage and disposal facility. A portion of this footage is sped up.
  • Hydrolysate Tanker Loading Station (10:22 – 10:31)
    Workers connect hoses to load a tanker with hydrolysate. This wastewater is shipped off site to a permitted hazardous waste treatment, storage and disposal facility.
  • Main Plant Aerial (10:31 – 10:41)
    An aerial drone flies over the Blue Grass main plant.

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BGCAPP Static Detonation Chamber 2000 Started Processing in January 2023

SDC 2000: On Jan. 27, 2023, operators at BGCAPP began using the SDC 2000 to destroy containerized rocket warheads drained of GB nerve agent; undrained, overpacked warheads; rockets unsuitable for processing in the main plant; and overpacked rockets and munitions components. While the last munition in the chemical weapons stockpile in Kentucky was destroyed July 7, 2023, the SDC 2000 will continue to destroy drained, containerized rocket warheads, considered secondary waste, during the plant’s closure phase.

  • Depalletizing Robot (0:00 – 0:12)
    A robot removes containerized Assembled Chemical Weapons Alternatives (ACWA) test equipment from a pallet during systems testing.
  • Containerized Rocket Warhead Delivery (0:12 – 0:17)
    A truck brings pallets of containerized rocket warheads drained of GB nerve agent from the BGCAPP main plant.
  • Workers Unload Pallets (0:17 – 0:46)
    Workers use a forklift to unload pallets of containerized rocket warheads from a flatbed truck.
  • Workers Inspect Pallet (0:46 – 0:51)
    Workers inspect a pallet of containerized rocket warheads prior to taking them inside the Static Detonation Chamber 2000 facility.
  • Workers Move Pallets (0:51 – 1:36)
    Workers use a forklift to move a pallet of containerized rocket warheads into the vestibule.
    Workers use a forklift to move a pallet of containerized rocket warheads inside the Static Detonation Chamber 2000 facility and place the pallet in the staging area.
  • Workers Sets Pallet in Depalletizing Station (1:36 – 2:10)
    Workers use a forklift to place a pallet of ACWA test equipment in the depalletizing station during systems testing.
  • Depalletizing Robot (2:10 – 3:03)
    A robot removes containerized ACWA test equipment from a pallet during systems testing.
    The automated system places the containerized ACWA test equipment into a processing box during systems testing.
  • Workers Unload Enhanced On-site Container (3:03-3:27)
    Workers use a forklift to unload rocket warheads overpacked inside single round containers from an Enhanced On-site Container.
  • Workers Load the Processing Line (3:27 – 4:01)
    Workers manually load single round containers into a processing box on the conveyor line.
  • Workers Load Overpacked Rockets (4:01 – 4:28)
    Workers manually load overpacked M55 rockets containing GB nerve agent into a processing box on the conveyor line.
  • Workers Load Containerized Rocket Warheads (4:28 – 5:02)
    Workers manually load containerized rocket warheads drained of GB nerve agent into a processing box on the conveyor line.
    Workers tape the boxes shut.
    Workers advance the boxes to the chamber elevator for processing with the automated system.
  • Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) Footage of Static Detonation Chamber Elevator (5:02 – 5:53)
    An elevator moves a processing box containing two containerized rocket warheads to the Static Detonation Chamber 2000 loading chamber.
    The box is pushed into the first loading chamber.
  • CCTV Footage of Inside Loading Chamber One (5:53 – 6:04)
    A processing box containing two containerized rocket warheads is pushed inside the first loading chamber.
  • CCTV Footage of Inside Loading Chamber Two (6:04 – 6:18)
    The second loading chamber rotates to drop a processing box into the chamber for destruction.
  • Locking Ring (6:18 – 6:30)
    The hydraulic locking ring on the chamber unlocks to allow it to drop down. This footage has been sped up.
  • Detonation Chamber Rotates (6:30 – 6:44)
    The chamber rotates for destruction inspection and to dump the scrap. This footage has been sped up.
  • CCTV Footage of Scrap Emptying (6:44 – 6:59)
    After the containerized rocket warheads are destroyed, the scrap metal is emptied into the shaker conveyor and collected in the scrap metal bin.

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Historic Video Footage: Completed Destruction Campaigns at the Blue Grass Chemical Agent Destruction Pilot Plant

The following video clips show historic footage of the completed destruction campaigns at the BGCAPP main plant and the Explosive Destruction Technology facilities. Portions of this footage have been blurred in accordance with Department of Defense guidelines.

BGCAPP Main Plant Completed VX M55 Rocket Campaign In April 2022

Main Plant: The main plant destroyed nerve agent munitions from the chemical weapons stockpile stored in Kentucky. Destruction of the M55 rockets containing VX nerve agent began July 9, 2021, and was completed April 19, 2022. This marked the elimination of the last VX nerve agent weapons in the United States chemical weapons stockpile.

  • Workers Unload a Pallet of VX M55 Rockets (0:00 – 0:06)
    Workers transfer M55 rockets from pallets used for storage and transport to a Rocket Non-Destructive Examination (RNDE) transfer cart.
  • Workers Place VX M55 Rockets into the Rocket Input Assembly (0:06 – 0:14)
    Workers place each rocket into the rocket input assembly for entry into the conveyor system that moves the rocket through the automated destruction process.
  • Enhanced On-site Container (EONC) Delivery and Storage (0:14 – 0:23)
    An EONC holding M55 rockets containing VX nerve agent is delivered to the Container Handling Building (CHB).
    A sideloader truck then places the EONC next to another EONC inside the CHB. A portion of this footage is sped up.
    The EONCs are containers designed to safely transport the chemical munitions from their monitored storage on the Blue Grass Army Depot to the Blue Grass Chemical Agent-Destruction Pilot Plant for destruction.
  • Workers Open and Unload M55 Rockets from the EONC (0:23 – 0:39)
    Workers open, inspect and unload two pallets of M55 rockets from an EONC.
  • Worker Removes Band from Pallet (0:39 – 0:45)
    A worker uses a tool to cut the metal bands off the pallet of M55 rockets in preparation for unpacking the rockets.
  • Unpacking and Loading Rockets onto Transfer Cart (0:45 – 0:50)
    Workers unpack the rockets from a pallet and load them onto a transfer cart.
  • RNDE Equipment (0:50 – 1:02)
    A worker loads a transfer cart of M55 rockets into the RNDE equipment.
    Workers examine an X-ray of the M55 rocket to look for agent leakage.
    An M55 rocket is picked up and moved to a transfer cart after being X-rayed in the RNDE equipment.
  • Workers Place M55 Rockets on Conveyor (1:02 – 1:22)
    Workers place M55 rockets onto the rocket input assembly. The rockets are then fed one at a time onto the conveyor to begin the automated destruction process.
  • Control and Support Building (1:22 – 1:27)
    Control Room operators and engineers communicate with technicians and remotely operate various systems throughout the facility.
  • Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) Footage of an M55 Rocket in Explosive Containment Vestibule (1:27 – 3:27)
    The rocket enters the Explosive Containment Vestibule and a robot places it in the Vertical Rocket Cutting Machine.
    The machine cuts the shipping and firing tube and the robot removes the top portion.
    The machine then makes a second cut to separate the warhead from the motor.
    Once separated, the first robot picks up the warhead to place it on the transfer station while a second robot places the shipping and firing tube on a conveyor to go to the Motor Packing Room.
    The first robot turns to retrieve the rocket motor from the Vertical Rocket Cutting Machine.
    The second robot picks up the warhead to continue its path to destruction.
  • CCTV Footage of an M55 Rocket Warhead in the Explosive Containment Room (3:27 – 5:36)
    The warhead enters the Explosive Containment Room.
    Automated equipment punches the warhead, and the chemical agent is drained, collected and neutralized.
    The drained warhead travels to a wrapper station to be wrapped with plastic. The plastic helps reduce agent contamination through the rest of the process.
    A robot places the warhead in a crimper station where it is containerized.
  • CCTV Footage of the Warhead Container Labeling Station (5:36 – 6:45)
    The robots move the containerized warhead to the next room where it is labeled and placed on a Mobile Industrial Robot.
    The robot moves the container to be placed in a skid.
  • CCTV Footage of the Motor Packing Room (6:45 – 7:38)
    A robot places the shipping and firing tube in a box for storage and later shipment for disposal.
    The robot then places the rocket motor into a box for storage and later destruction.
  • Boxes of Rocket Motors Sent for Storage (7:38 – 7:54)
    The boxes are loaded onto a truck and are sent to a storage igloo for storage before they are later shipped for final disposal.
  • Pallets of Rocket Warheads Sent for Storage (7:54 – 8:10)
    Workers load the containerized, drained rocket warhead skids onto a truck.
    A truck transports containerized, drained rocket warhead skids to a storage igloo for later destruction in the Static Detonation Chamber 1200.
  • Hydrolysate Storage Area tanks (8:10 – 8:20)
    The Hydrolysate Storage Area tanks store hydrolysate, the product of the neutralization of chemical agent, until it is ready to be shipped to a permitted hazardous waste treatment, storage and disposal facility. A portion of this footage is sped up.
  • Clean-air Exhaust Stacks (8:20 – 8:30)
    The Clean-air Exhaust Stacks and Filter Banks are shown at sunrise. This footage has been sped up.

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BGCAPP Main Plant Completed VX 155mm Projectile Operations In May 2021

Main Plant: The main plant destroyed nerve agent munitions from the chemical weapons stockpile stored in Kentucky. On Jan. 10, 2021, the first VX 155mm projectiles were destroyed. The campaign was completed on May 28, 2021.

  • Loading VX 155mm Projectiles (0:00 – 0:10)
    A munitions handler positions a 155mm projectile containing VX nerve agent for placement into a tray within the Unpack Area of the Munitions Demilitarization Building to begin the destruction process.
  • Enhanced On-site Container (EONC) Delivery (0:10 – 0:15)
    A truck pulling an EONC holding VX 155mm projectiles arrives at the entry to the Container Handling Building. The EONCs are containers designed to safely transport the chemical munitions from their monitored storage on the Blue Grass Army Depot to the Blue Grass Chemical Agent-Destruction Pilot Plant for destruction.
  • Agent Designation (0:15 – 0:18)
    A worker places a marker designating the specific agent in the unloading operation on a sign board readily visible to operations personnel in the Container Handling Building.
  • EONC Unloading (0:18 – 0:26)
    A munitions handler checks the projectiles inside an EONC as the door is opened inside the Unpack Area in the main plant.
  • EONC Unloading (0:27 – 0:37)
    A spotter watches as a forklift driver removes a pallet of VX 155mm projectiles from an EONC inside the main plant’s Unpack Area.
  • Moving Projectile Pallets (0:37 – 0:46)
    A sequence of clips shows workers moving a pallet of VX 155mm projectiles for staging and placement into the destruction process.
  • Removing Positioning Rings (0:47 – 0:50)
    A worker uses a crowbar to loosen a positioning ring on a projectile in a pallet. The rings need to be removed before the projectiles are placed into form-fitting trays for entry into the destruction process.
  • Loading Projectiles into Trays (0:51 – 1:03)
    A series of clips depict workers using a lift assist to pick up projectiles from pallets and place them into trays for entry into the destruction process in the Munitions Demilitarization Building.
  • Loading Projectiles into Trays (1:03 – 1:09)
    A loaded tray of VX 155mm projectiles is conveyed into the automated section of the plant to begin the destruction process. Human hands do not touch these projectiles again as part of the standard destruction process.
  • Munitions Washout System (1:09 – 2:15)
    The Munitions Washout System robot moves nerve-agent projectiles through each element of the system. The projectile nose closure is removed. The projectile is then checked for energetics or explosives. Next, it is placed in the Cavity Access Machine to drain the liquid chemical agent. Finally, it is weighed and then placed in the projectile tray to be thermally decontaminated in the Metal Parts Treater.
  • Metal Parts Treater (2:15 – 2:29)
    A series of clips depicts a tray of drained projectile bodies progressing through the Metal Parts Treater, which inductively heats them to more than 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit for at least 15 minutes to thermally cleanse them.
  • Cool Down Area (2:29 – 2:32)
    A worker checks a pallet of projectile bodies after it has been thermally decontaminated and cooled to room temperature in the Cool Down Area in the Munitions Demilitarization Building. The metal bodies are taken off site for recycling at a permitted facility.
  • Control and Support Building (2:32 – 2:43)
    Control Room operators communicate with technicians and remotely operate various systems throughout the facility.
  • Hydrolysate Storage Area tanks (2:44 – 2:54)
    The Hydrolysate Storage Area tanks store hydrolysate, the product of the neutralization of chemical agent, as it awaits shipment to a permitted hazardous waste treatment, storage and disposal facility. A portion of this footage has been sped up.
  • Clean-air Exhaust Stacks (2:54 – 3:04)
    The Clean-air Exhaust Stacks and Filter Banks are shown at sunrise. The stacks release clean, filtered air from the chemical demilitarization facility back to the atmosphere. This footage has been sped up.

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BGCAPP Explosive Destruction Technology Completed H 155mm Projectile Operations In September 2021

Explosive Destruction Technology Facility: This facility, housing a Static Detonation Chamber (SDC) unit, destroyed Kentucky’s mustard agent munitions. Mustard agent destruction operations began June 7, 2019, and were completed on Sept. 4, 2021. This SDC, now known as the SDC 1200, will destroy drained, containerized rocket warheads, considered secondary waste, during the plant’s closure phase.

  • Munitions delivery (0:00 – 0:15)
    Munitions are delivered in an Enhanced On-site Container (EONC) before being unloaded at the Explosive Destruction Technology Facility.
    The EONCs are containers designed to safely transport the chemical munitions from their monitored storage on the Blue Grass Army Depot to the Blue Grass Chemical Agent-Destruction Pilot Plant for destruction.
  • Munitions movement (0:15 – 0:30)
    Munitions handlers use a lift-assist crane to move 155mm projectiles filled with mustard agent from a pallet to feed boxes in preparation for destruction.
  • Rotating band removal (0:30 – 0:38)
    Munitions handlers use metal snips to remove the rotating band from a projectile and place it inside the box to be processed in the Static Detonation Chamber (SDC).
    Should there be a sentence here explaining what this is?
  • Box sealing and marking (0:38 – 0:56)
    Munitions handlers use a lift-assist crane to lower a projectile into the cardboard box before sealing it closed and marking it in preparation for destruction.
  • Munitions elevator (0:56 – 1:14)
    Boxes containing the projectiles are transported to the top of the SDC using an elevator.
    At the top, the box is transferred to the chamber vessel by the Airlock Feed Conveyor.
  • SDC (1:14 – 1:30)
    The Explosive Destruction Technology Enclosure Building holds an SDC unit. This equipment used thermal destruction technology to safely destroy Kentucky’s mustard munitions stockpile.
  • Recycled munitions (1:30 – 1:36)
    Once munitions are destroyed, the decontaminated scrap metal bodies exit the SDC on a conveyor and are stored in roll-off bins in preparation for transport for recycling at a permitted facility.

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BGCAPP Main Plant Completed GB 8-Inch Projectile Operations In May 2020

Main Plant: The main plant destroyed nerve agent munitions from the chemical weapons stockpile stored in Kentucky. Destruction of the 8-inch projectiles containing GB nerve agent began Jan. 17, 2020, and was completed May 11, 2020.

  • Workers move pallets of 8-inch projectiles (0:00 – 0:12)
    Workers use forklifts to move and place pallets of 8-inch projectiles through the plant as spotters help guide them through the process.
  • Unpacking and loading of a pallet of 8-inch projectiles (0:12 – 0:18)
    Munitions are shown being moved down a conveyor system.
  • Munitions Washout System (MWS) processes 8-inch projectiles (0:18 – 0:28)
    The robot removes an 8-inch projectile from the tray on the conveyor and places it at the Nose Closure Removal Station.
  • Control and Support Building (0:28 – 0:31)
    Control Room operators communicate with technicians and remotely operate various systems throughout the facility.
  • Hydrolysate Storage Area tanks (0:31 – 0:39)
    The Hydrolysate Storage Area tanks store hydrolysate, the product of the neutralization of chemical agent, until it is ready to be shipped to a permitted hazardous waste treatment, storage and disposal facility. A portion of this footage is sped up.
  • Clean-air Exhaust Stacks (0:39 – 0:45)
    The Clean-air Exhaust Stacks and Filter Banks are shown at sunrise. This footage has been sped up.
  • Enhanced On-site Container (EONC) delivery and storage (0:45 – 1:17)
    An EONC holding 8-inch projectiles containing GB nerve agent is delivered to the Container Handling Building (CHB).
    A sideloader is shown coming out of the CHB, lifting the EONC off the delivery truck and bringing it into the CHB.
    A sideloader then places the EONC next to another EONC inside the CHB.
    The EONCs are containers designed to safely transport the chemical munitions from their monitored storage on the Blue Grass Army Depot to the Blue Grass Chemical Agent-Destruction Pilot Plant for destruction.
  • EONC movement from the CHB to the Munitions Demilitarization Building (MDB) (1:17 – 3:09)
    The sideloader picks up an EONC out of a row of EONCs, moves it through a series of large blast doors and unloads it in the Unpack Area in the MDB.
  • Workers open and unload 8-inch projectiles from the EONC (3:09 – 4:04)
    Workers open, inspect and unload two pallets of 8-inch projectiles from an EONC.
  • Workers move pallets of 8-inch projectiles (4:04 – 4:59)
    Workers use forklifts to place and move pallets of 8-inch projectiles through the plant as spotters help guide them through the process.
  • Unpacking and loading of a pallet of 8-inch projectiles (4:59 – 5:40)
    Workers unstrap a pallet of 8-inch projectiles and use a hand crane to lift and lower them onto a conveyor. This is the last time human hands touch the projectiles during standard destruction operations.
    The munitions are then conveyed through a blast door into the conveyor room.
  • Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) footage of 8-inch projectiles passing through the conveyor room (5:40 – 6:53)
    A tray of 8-inch projectiles passes through the blast doors along a conveyor system on their way to the MWS room.
  • MWS processes 8-inch projectiles (6:53 – 8:33)
    The robot removes an 8-inch projectile from the tray on the conveyor and places it at the Nose Closure Removal Station.
    Automated equipment removes the lifting lug from the 8-inch projectile and the projectile is weighed on a scale.
    The munition is transferred to a Cavity Access Machine to be drained of its GB nerve agent.
    A robot lifts the 8-inch projectile, showing the final drops of GB nerve agent draining into the MWS. The projectile is weighed again before being returned to the tray on the conveyor.
  • 8-inch projectiles enter the Metal Parts Treater (MPT) (8:33 – 9:11)
    The tray of 8-inch projectiles on a conveyor enter the MPT.
    The projectile bodies are heated to 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit for a minimum of 15 minutes to destroy any residual GB nerve agent before proceeding to the cooldown area.
  • Clean-air Exhaust Stacks (9:11 – 9:16)
    The Clean-air Exhaust Stacks are shown at sunrise. The stacks release clean, filtered air from the chemical demilitarization facility back to the atmosphere.
  • MDB Filter Banks (9:16 – 9:55)
    Carbon filters are installed in the MDB Filter Banks. The filters scrub the air of contaminants from the building before being released to the atmosphere. Continuous air-monitoring systems installed in the filter banks and air stacks monitor to ensure there is no residual agent released.
  • Control and Support Building (9:55 – 10:01)
    Control Room operators communicate with technicians and remotely operate various systems throughout the facility.
  • Hydrolysate Storage Area tanks (10:01 – 10:12)
    The Hydrolysate Storage Area tanks store hydrolysate, the product of the neutralization of chemical agent, until it is ready to be shipped to a permitted hazardous waste treatment, storage and disposal facility. A portion of this footage is sped up.
  • Clean-air Exhaust Stacks (10:12 – 10:21)
    The Clean-air Exhaust Stacks and Filter Banks are shown at sunrise. This footage has been sped up.

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BGCAPP Aerial Photo:

Video Footage: Blue Grass Chemical Agent-Destruction Pilot Plant Operations

The following video clips show the destruction facilities where mustard and nerve agent munitions were destroyed. Portions of this footage have been blurred in accordance with Department of Defense guidelines.

BGCAPP Main Plant Destroyed GB M55 Rockets from July 2022 to July 2023

This video shows how the main plant destroyed nerve agent munitions from the chemical weapons stockpile stored in Kentucky. Destruction of the M55 rockets containing GB nerve agent began July 6, 2022, and ended July 7, 2023.

  • Workers Place GB M55 Rockets on Transfer Cart (0:00 – 0:14)
    Workers transfer M55 rockets from pallets used for storage and transport to a Rocket Non-Destructive Examination (RNDE) transfer cart.
  • Main Plant Aerial (0:14 – 0:19)
    An aerial drone flies over the Blue Grass main plant.
  • Enhanced On-site Container (EONC) Delivery and Storage (0:19 – 0:24)
    A sideloader truck places an EONC containing M55 rockets next to another EONC inside the Container Handling Building. A portion of this footage is sped up.
    The EONCs are containers designed to safely transport the chemical munitions from their monitored storage on the Blue Grass Army Depot to the Blue Grass Chemical Agent-Destruction Pilot Plant for destruction.
  • Workers Monitor the EONC for Agent Readings (0:24 – 0:27)
    Workers use the Miniature Continuous Air Monitoring System to check for readings of chemical agent inside the EONC before opening the door.
  • Workers Open and Unload M55 Rockets from the EONC (0:27 – 0:38)
    Workers open, inspect and unload two pallets of M55 rockets from an EONC.
  • Worker Removes Band from Pallet (0:38 – 0:45)
    A worker uses a tool to cut the metal bands off the pallet of M55 rockets in preparation for unpacking the rockets.
    Pan of M55 rockets on the pallet waiting to be unloaded.
  • Unpacking and Loading Rockets onto Transfer Cart (0:45 – 1:02)
    Workers unpack the M55 rockets from a pallet and load them onto a transfer cart.
  • RNDE Equipment (0:50 – 1:36)
    A worker loads a transfer cart of M55 rockets into the RNDE equipment.
    A worker pushes the button to start the RNDE equipment.
    An M55 rocket is tilted to enter the machine for evaluation.
    Workers examine an image, much like an X-ray, of the M55 rocket to look for agent leakage.
    An M55 rocket is picked up and moved to a transfer cart after being scanned in the RNDE equipment.
  • Workers Place M55 Rockets on Conveyor (1:36 – 2:15)
    A worker pushes a transfer cart to the loading position for the rocket input assembly.
    Workers place M55 rockets onto the rocket input assembly. The rockets are then fed one at a time onto the conveyor to begin the automated destruction process.
  • Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) Footage of an M55 Rocket in Explosive Containment Vestibule (2:15 – 4:53)
    The rocket enters the Explosive Containment Vestibule and a robot places it in the Vertical Rocket Cutting Machine.
    The machine cuts the shipping and firing tube and the robot removes the top portion.
    The first robot stabilizes the rocket as the machine then makes a second cut to separate the warhead from the motor while a second robot places the shipping and firing tube on a conveyor to go to the Motor Packing Room.
    Once separated, the first robot picks up the warhead to place it on the transfer station.
    The first robot turns to retrieve the rocket motor from the Vertical Rocket Cutting Machine while the second robot picks up the warhead to continue its path to destruction.
    The conveyor moves the warhead to the Explosive Containment Room.
  • CCTV Footage of an M55 Rocket Warhead in the Explosive Containment Room (4:54 – 7:38)
    Automated equipment punches the warhead and the chemical agent is drained, collected and neutralized.
    A robot places the warhead in a crimper station where it is containerized.
  • CCTV Footage of the Warhead Container Labeling Station (7:38 – 8:46)
    The robots move the containerized warhead to the next room where it is labeled and placed on a Mobile Industrial Robot.
    The robot moves the container to be placed in a skid.
  • CCTV Footage of the Motor Packing Room (8:46 – 9:39)
    A robot places the shipping and firing tube in a box for storage and later shipment for disposal.
    The robot then places the rocket motor into a box for storage and later destruction.
  • Boxes of Rocket Motors Sent for Storage (9:40 – 9:55)
    The boxes are loaded onto a truck and are sent to a storage igloo for storage before they are later shipped for final disposal.
  • Pallets of Rocket Warheads Sent for Storage (9:55 – 10:11)
    Workers load the containerized, drained rocket warhead skids onto a truck.
    A truck transports containerized, drained rocket warhead skids to a storage igloo for later destruction in a Static Detonation Chamber.
  • Hydrolysate Storage Area tanks (10:11 – 10:22)
    The Hydrolysate Storage Area tanks store hydrolysate, the product of the neutralization of chemical agent, until it is ready to be shipped to a permitted hazardous waste treatment, storage and disposal facility. A portion of this footage is sped up.
  • Hydrolysate Tanker Loading Station (10:22 – 10:31)
    Workers connect hoses to load a tanker with hydrolysate. This wastewater is shipped off site to a permitted hazardous waste treatment, storage and disposal facility.
  • Main Plant Aerial (10:31 – 10:41)
    An aerial drone flies over the Blue Grass main plant.

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BGCAPP Static Detonation Chamber 2000 Started Processing in January 2023

SDC 2000: On Jan. 27, 2023, operators at BGCAPP began using the SDC 2000 to destroy containerized rocket warheads drained of GB nerve agent; undrained, overpacked warheads; rockets unsuitable for processing in the main plant; and overpacked rockets and munitions components. While the last munition in the chemical weapons stockpile in Kentucky was destroyed July 7, 2023, the SDC 2000 will continue to destroy drained, containerized rocket warheads, considered secondary waste, during the plant’s closure phase.

  • Depalletizing Robot (0:00 – 0:12)
    A robot removes containerized Assembled Chemical Weapons Alternatives (ACWA) test equipment from a pallet during systems testing.
  • Containerized Rocket Warhead Delivery (0:12 – 0:17)
    A truck brings pallets of containerized rocket warheads drained of GB nerve agent from the BGCAPP main plant.
  • Workers Unload Pallets (0:17 – 0:46)
    Workers use a forklift to unload pallets of containerized rocket warheads from a flatbed truck.
  • Workers Inspect Pallet (0:46 – 0:51)
    Workers inspect a pallet of containerized rocket warheads prior to taking them inside the Static Detonation Chamber 2000 facility.
  • Workers Move Pallets (0:51 – 1:36)
    Workers use a forklift to move a pallet of containerized rocket warheads into the vestibule.
    Workers use a forklift to move a pallet of containerized rocket warheads inside the Static Detonation Chamber 2000 facility and place the pallet in the staging area.
  • Workers Sets Pallet in Depalletizing Station (1:36 – 2:10)
    Workers use a forklift to place a pallet of ACWA test equipment in the depalletizing station during systems testing.
  • Depalletizing Robot (2:10 – 3:03)
    A robot removes containerized ACWA test equipment from a pallet during systems testing.
    The automated system places the containerized ACWA test equipment into a processing box during systems testing.
  • Workers Unload Enhanced On-site Container (3:03-3:27)
    Workers use a forklift to unload rocket warheads overpacked inside single round containers from an Enhanced On-site Container.
  • Workers Load the Processing Line (3:27 – 4:01)
    Workers manually load single round containers into a processing box on the conveyor line.
  • Workers Load Overpacked Rockets (4:01 – 4:28)
    Workers manually load overpacked M55 rockets containing GB nerve agent into a processing box on the conveyor line.
  • Workers Load Containerized Rocket Warheads (4:28 – 5:02)
    Workers manually load containerized rocket warheads drained of GB nerve agent into a processing box on the conveyor line.
    Workers tape the boxes shut.
    Workers advance the boxes to the chamber elevator for processing with the automated system.
  • Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) Footage of Static Detonation Chamber Elevator (5:02 – 5:53)
    An elevator moves a processing box containing two containerized rocket warheads to the Static Detonation Chamber 2000 loading chamber.
    The box is pushed into the first loading chamber.
  • CCTV Footage of Inside Loading Chamber One (5:53 – 6:04)
    A processing box containing two containerized rocket warheads is pushed inside the first loading chamber.
  • CCTV Footage of Inside Loading Chamber Two (6:04 – 6:18)
    The second loading chamber rotates to drop a processing box into the chamber for destruction.
  • Locking Ring (6:18 – 6:30)
    The hydraulic locking ring on the chamber unlocks to allow it to drop down. This footage has been sped up.
  • Detonation Chamber Rotates (6:30 – 6:44)
    The chamber rotates for destruction inspection and to dump the scrap. This footage has been sped up.
  • CCTV Footage of Scrap Emptying (6:44 – 6:59)
    After the containerized rocket warheads are destroyed, the scrap metal is emptied into the shaker conveyor and collected in the scrap metal bin.

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Historic Video Footage: Completed Destruction Campaigns at the Blue Grass Chemical Agent Destruction Pilot Plant

The following video clips show historic footage of the completed destruction campaigns at the BGCAPP main plant and the Explosive Destruction Technology facilities. Portions of this footage have been blurred in accordance with Department of Defense guidelines.

BGCAPP Main Plant Completed VX M55 Rocket Campaign In April 2022

Main Plant: The main plant destroyed nerve agent munitions from the chemical weapons stockpile stored in Kentucky. Destruction of the M55 rockets containing VX nerve agent began July 9, 2021, and was completed April 19, 2022. This marked the elimination of the last VX nerve agent weapons in the United States chemical weapons stockpile.

  • Workers Unload a Pallet of VX M55 Rockets (0:00 – 0:06)
    Workers transfer M55 rockets from pallets used for storage and transport to a Rocket Non-Destructive Examination (RNDE) transfer cart.
  • Workers Place VX M55 Rockets into the Rocket Input Assembly (0:06 – 0:14)
    Workers place each rocket into the rocket input assembly for entry into the conveyor system that moves the rocket through the automated destruction process.
  • Enhanced On-site Container (EONC) Delivery and Storage (0:14 – 0:23)
    An EONC holding M55 rockets containing VX nerve agent is delivered to the Container Handling Building (CHB).
    A sideloader truck then places the EONC next to another EONC inside the CHB. A portion of this footage is sped up.
    The EONCs are containers designed to safely transport the chemical munitions from their monitored storage on the Blue Grass Army Depot to the Blue Grass Chemical Agent-Destruction Pilot Plant for destruction.
  • Workers Open and Unload M55 Rockets from the EONC (0:23 – 0:39)
    Workers open, inspect and unload two pallets of M55 rockets from an EONC.
  • Worker Removes Band from Pallet (0:39 – 0:45)
    A worker uses a tool to cut the metal bands off the pallet of M55 rockets in preparation for unpacking the rockets.
  • Unpacking and Loading Rockets onto Transfer Cart (0:45 – 0:50)
    Workers unpack the rockets from a pallet and load them onto a transfer cart.
  • RNDE Equipment (0:50 – 1:02)
    A worker loads a transfer cart of M55 rockets into the RNDE equipment.
    Workers examine an X-ray of the M55 rocket to look for agent leakage.
    An M55 rocket is picked up and moved to a transfer cart after being X-rayed in the RNDE equipment.
  • Workers Place M55 Rockets on Conveyor (1:02 – 1:22)
    Workers place M55 rockets onto the rocket input assembly. The rockets are then fed one at a time onto the conveyor to begin the automated destruction process.
  • Control and Support Building (1:22 – 1:27)
    Control Room operators and engineers communicate with technicians and remotely operate various systems throughout the facility.
  • Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) Footage of an M55 Rocket in Explosive Containment Vestibule (1:27 – 3:27)
    The rocket enters the Explosive Containment Vestibule and a robot places it in the Vertical Rocket Cutting Machine.
    The machine cuts the shipping and firing tube and the robot removes the top portion.
    The machine then makes a second cut to separate the warhead from the motor.
    Once separated, the first robot picks up the warhead to place it on the transfer station while a second robot places the shipping and firing tube on a conveyor to go to the Motor Packing Room.
    The first robot turns to retrieve the rocket motor from the Vertical Rocket Cutting Machine.
    The second robot picks up the warhead to continue its path to destruction.
  • CCTV Footage of an M55 Rocket Warhead in the Explosive Containment Room (3:27 – 5:36)
    The warhead enters the Explosive Containment Room.
    Automated equipment punches the warhead, and the chemical agent is drained, collected and neutralized.
    The drained warhead travels to a wrapper station to be wrapped with plastic. The plastic helps reduce agent contamination through the rest of the process.
    A robot places the warhead in a crimper station where it is containerized.
  • CCTV Footage of the Warhead Container Labeling Station (5:36 – 6:45)
    The robots move the containerized warhead to the next room where it is labeled and placed on a Mobile Industrial Robot.
    The robot moves the container to be placed in a skid.
  • CCTV Footage of the Motor Packing Room (6:45 – 7:38)
    A robot places the shipping and firing tube in a box for storage and later shipment for disposal.
    The robot then places the rocket motor into a box for storage and later destruction.
  • Boxes of Rocket Motors Sent for Storage (7:38 – 7:54)
    The boxes are loaded onto a truck and are sent to a storage igloo for storage before they are later shipped for final disposal.
  • Pallets of Rocket Warheads Sent for Storage (7:54 – 8:10)
    Workers load the containerized, drained rocket warhead skids onto a truck.
    A truck transports containerized, drained rocket warhead skids to a storage igloo for later destruction in the Static Detonation Chamber 1200.
  • Hydrolysate Storage Area tanks (8:10 – 8:20)
    The Hydrolysate Storage Area tanks store hydrolysate, the product of the neutralization of chemical agent, until it is ready to be shipped to a permitted hazardous waste treatment, storage and disposal facility. A portion of this footage is sped up.
  • Clean-air Exhaust Stacks (8:20 – 8:30)
    The Clean-air Exhaust Stacks and Filter Banks are shown at sunrise. This footage has been sped up.

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BGCAPP Main Plant Completed VX 155mm Projectile Operations In May 2021

Main Plant: The main plant destroyed nerve agent munitions from the chemical weapons stockpile stored in Kentucky. On Jan. 10, 2021, the first VX 155mm projectiles were destroyed. The campaign was completed on May 28, 2021.

  • Loading VX 155mm Projectiles (0:00 – 0:10)
    A munitions handler positions a 155mm projectile containing VX nerve agent for placement into a tray within the Unpack Area of the Munitions Demilitarization Building to begin the destruction process.
  • Enhanced On-site Container (EONC) Delivery (0:10 – 0:15)
    A truck pulling an EONC holding VX 155mm projectiles arrives at the entry to the Container Handling Building. The EONCs are containers designed to safely transport the chemical munitions from their monitored storage on the Blue Grass Army Depot to the Blue Grass Chemical Agent-Destruction Pilot Plant for destruction.
  • Agent Designation (0:15 – 0:18)
    A worker places a marker designating the specific agent in the unloading operation on a sign board readily visible to operations personnel in the Container Handling Building.
  • EONC Unloading (0:18 – 0:26)
    A munitions handler checks the projectiles inside an EONC as the door is opened inside the Unpack Area in the main plant.
  • EONC Unloading (0:27 – 0:37)
    A spotter watches as a forklift driver removes a pallet of VX 155mm projectiles from an EONC inside the main plant’s Unpack Area.
  • Moving Projectile Pallets (0:37 – 0:46)
    A sequence of clips shows workers moving a pallet of VX 155mm projectiles for staging and placement into the destruction process.
  • Removing Positioning Rings (0:47 – 0:50)
    A worker uses a crowbar to loosen a positioning ring on a projectile in a pallet. The rings need to be removed before the projectiles are placed into form-fitting trays for entry into the destruction process.
  • Loading Projectiles into Trays (0:51 – 1:03)
    A series of clips depict workers using a lift assist to pick up projectiles from pallets and place them into trays for entry into the destruction process in the Munitions Demilitarization Building.
  • Loading Projectiles into Trays (1:03 – 1:09)
    A loaded tray of VX 155mm projectiles is conveyed into the automated section of the plant to begin the destruction process. Human hands do not touch these projectiles again as part of the standard destruction process.
  • Munitions Washout System (1:09 – 2:15)
    The Munitions Washout System robot moves nerve-agent projectiles through each element of the system. The projectile nose closure is removed. The projectile is then checked for energetics or explosives. Next, it is placed in the Cavity Access Machine to drain the liquid chemical agent. Finally, it is weighed and then placed in the projectile tray to be thermally decontaminated in the Metal Parts Treater.
  • Metal Parts Treater (2:15 – 2:29)
    A series of clips depicts a tray of drained projectile bodies progressing through the Metal Parts Treater, which inductively heats them to more than 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit for at least 15 minutes to thermally cleanse them.
  • Cool Down Area (2:29 – 2:32)
    A worker checks a pallet of projectile bodies after it has been thermally decontaminated and cooled to room temperature in the Cool Down Area in the Munitions Demilitarization Building. The metal bodies are taken off site for recycling at a permitted facility.
  • Control and Support Building (2:32 – 2:43)
    Control Room operators communicate with technicians and remotely operate various systems throughout the facility.
  • Hydrolysate Storage Area tanks (2:44 – 2:54)
    The Hydrolysate Storage Area tanks store hydrolysate, the product of the neutralization of chemical agent, as it awaits shipment to a permitted hazardous waste treatment, storage and disposal facility. A portion of this footage has been sped up.
  • Clean-air Exhaust Stacks (2:54 – 3:04)
    The Clean-air Exhaust Stacks and Filter Banks are shown at sunrise. The stacks release clean, filtered air from the chemical demilitarization facility back to the atmosphere. This footage has been sped up.

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BGCAPP Explosive Destruction Technology Completed H 155mm Projectile Operations In September 2021

Explosive Destruction Technology Facility: This facility, housing a Static Detonation Chamber (SDC) unit, destroyed Kentucky’s mustard agent munitions. Mustard agent destruction operations began June 7, 2019, and were completed on Sept. 4, 2021. This SDC, now known as the SDC 1200, will destroy drained, containerized rocket warheads, considered secondary waste, during the plant’s closure phase.

  • Munitions delivery (0:00 – 0:15)
    Munitions are delivered in an Enhanced On-site Container (EONC) before being unloaded at the Explosive Destruction Technology Facility.
    The EONCs are containers designed to safely transport the chemical munitions from their monitored storage on the Blue Grass Army Depot to the Blue Grass Chemical Agent-Destruction Pilot Plant for destruction.
  • Munitions movement (0:15 – 0:30)
    Munitions handlers use a lift-assist crane to move 155mm projectiles filled with mustard agent from a pallet to feed boxes in preparation for destruction.
  • Rotating band removal (0:30 – 0:38)
    Munitions handlers use metal snips to remove the rotating band from a projectile and place it inside the box to be processed in the Static Detonation Chamber (SDC).
    Should there be a sentence here explaining what this is?
  • Box sealing and marking (0:38 – 0:56)
    Munitions handlers use a lift-assist crane to lower a projectile into the cardboard box before sealing it closed and marking it in preparation for destruction.
  • Munitions elevator (0:56 – 1:14)
    Boxes containing the projectiles are transported to the top of the SDC using an elevator.
    At the top, the box is transferred to the chamber vessel by the Airlock Feed Conveyor.
  • SDC (1:14 – 1:30)
    The Explosive Destruction Technology Enclosure Building holds an SDC unit. This equipment used thermal destruction technology to safely destroy Kentucky’s mustard munitions stockpile.
  • Recycled munitions (1:30 – 1:36)
    Once munitions are destroyed, the decontaminated scrap metal bodies exit the SDC on a conveyor and are stored in roll-off bins in preparation for transport for recycling at a permitted facility.

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BGCAPP Main Plant Completed GB 8-Inch Projectile Operations In May 2020

Main Plant: The main plant destroyed nerve agent munitions from the chemical weapons stockpile stored in Kentucky. Destruction of the 8-inch projectiles containing GB nerve agent began Jan. 17, 2020, and was completed May 11, 2020.

  • Workers move pallets of 8-inch projectiles (0:00 – 0:12)
    Workers use forklifts to move and place pallets of 8-inch projectiles through the plant as spotters help guide them through the process.
  • Unpacking and loading of a pallet of 8-inch projectiles (0:12 – 0:18)
    Munitions are shown being moved down a conveyor system.
  • Munitions Washout System (MWS) processes 8-inch projectiles (0:18 – 0:28)
    The robot removes an 8-inch projectile from the tray on the conveyor and places it at the Nose Closure Removal Station.
  • Control and Support Building (0:28 – 0:31)
    Control Room operators communicate with technicians and remotely operate various systems throughout the facility.
  • Hydrolysate Storage Area tanks (0:31 – 0:39)
    The Hydrolysate Storage Area tanks store hydrolysate, the product of the neutralization of chemical agent, until it is ready to be shipped to a permitted hazardous waste treatment, storage and disposal facility. A portion of this footage is sped up.
  • Clean-air Exhaust Stacks (0:39 – 0:45)
    The Clean-air Exhaust Stacks and Filter Banks are shown at sunrise. This footage has been sped up.
  • Enhanced On-site Container (EONC) delivery and storage (0:45 – 1:17)
    An EONC holding 8-inch projectiles containing GB nerve agent is delivered to the Container Handling Building (CHB).
    A sideloader is shown coming out of the CHB, lifting the EONC off the delivery truck and bringing it into the CHB.
    A sideloader then places the EONC next to another EONC inside the CHB.
    The EONCs are containers designed to safely transport the chemical munitions from their monitored storage on the Blue Grass Army Depot to the Blue Grass Chemical Agent-Destruction Pilot Plant for destruction.
  • EONC movement from the CHB to the Munitions Demilitarization Building (MDB) (1:17 – 3:09)
    The sideloader picks up an EONC out of a row of EONCs, moves it through a series of large blast doors and unloads it in the Unpack Area in the MDB.
  • Workers open and unload 8-inch projectiles from the EONC (3:09 – 4:04)
    Workers open, inspect and unload two pallets of 8-inch projectiles from an EONC.
  • Workers move pallets of 8-inch projectiles (4:04 – 4:59)
    Workers use forklifts to place and move pallets of 8-inch projectiles through the plant as spotters help guide them through the process.
  • Unpacking and loading of a pallet of 8-inch projectiles (4:59 – 5:40)
    Workers unstrap a pallet of 8-inch projectiles and use a hand crane to lift and lower them onto a conveyor. This is the last time human hands touch the projectiles during standard destruction operations.
    The munitions are then conveyed through a blast door into the conveyor room.
  • Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) footage of 8-inch projectiles passing through the conveyor room (5:40 – 6:53)
    A tray of 8-inch projectiles passes through the blast doors along a conveyor system on their way to the MWS room.
  • MWS processes 8-inch projectiles (6:53 – 8:33)
    The robot removes an 8-inch projectile from the tray on the conveyor and places it at the Nose Closure Removal Station.
    Automated equipment removes the lifting lug from the 8-inch projectile and the projectile is weighed on a scale.
    The munition is transferred to a Cavity Access Machine to be drained of its GB nerve agent.
    A robot lifts the 8-inch projectile, showing the final drops of GB nerve agent draining into the MWS. The projectile is weighed again before being returned to the tray on the conveyor.
  • 8-inch projectiles enter the Metal Parts Treater (MPT) (8:33 – 9:11)
    The tray of 8-inch projectiles on a conveyor enter the MPT.
    The projectile bodies are heated to 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit for a minimum of 15 minutes to destroy any residual GB nerve agent before proceeding to the cooldown area.
  • Clean-air Exhaust Stacks (9:11 – 9:16)
    The Clean-air Exhaust Stacks are shown at sunrise. The stacks release clean, filtered air from the chemical demilitarization facility back to the atmosphere.
  • MDB Filter Banks (9:16 – 9:55)
    Carbon filters are installed in the MDB Filter Banks. The filters scrub the air of contaminants from the building before being released to the atmosphere. Continuous air-monitoring systems installed in the filter banks and air stacks monitor to ensure there is no residual agent released.
  • Control and Support Building (9:55 – 10:01)
    Control Room operators communicate with technicians and remotely operate various systems throughout the facility.
  • Hydrolysate Storage Area tanks (10:01 – 10:12)
    The Hydrolysate Storage Area tanks store hydrolysate, the product of the neutralization of chemical agent, until it is ready to be shipped to a permitted hazardous waste treatment, storage and disposal facility. A portion of this footage is sped up.
  • Clean-air Exhaust Stacks (10:12 – 10:21)
    The Clean-air Exhaust Stacks and Filter Banks are shown at sunrise. This footage has been sped up.

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More BGCAPP Resources

To learn more about the destruction of the U.S. chemical weapons stockpile in Kentucky, click on the links below to access press releases, news articles and videos.

Contact us:

For media inquiries about the Blue Grass Chemical Agent-Destruction Pilot Plant, contact:

Mark York
(859) 200-8670
mhyork@bechtel.us

Blue Grass Chemical Stockpile Outreach Office
(859) 626-8944
bgoutreach@iem.com

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